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Dr Sunil Singh performs Watchman Flx

Dr Singh performed one of the first Watchman Flx procedures, at Memorial Hospital yesterday! This is a new, exciting option for patients that want to get off blood thinners for AFib. To learn more about the WatchmanFlx, visit http://ow.ly/L4OX50Bi9lE To learn more about Dr Singh or any of our wonderful doctors, please visit http://ow.ly/a2sL50BhA2Z To make an appointment at any one of our 9 locations, please call: Duval: (904) 423-0010 Clay: (904) 375-8100 St. Johns: (904) 342-8300 Flagler and Putnam: (386) 446-9966 #FCHV #FirstCoastHeart #watchman #memorialhospital #DrSingh #TopDocs #jacksonvillecardiologist #cardiologist #cardiology #afib #AF #watchmanflx

Dr. Dinesh Pubbi discusses AFib Part 1

Electrophysiologist, Dr. Dinesh Pubbi with First Coast Heart & Vascular Center discusses Atrial Fibrillation (AFib).

New EP Lab Flagler Hospital St. Augustine

First Coast Heart & Vascular Center is proud to be a part of Flagler Hospital’s new EP Lab. Dr. Neil Sanghvi talks about the new EP Lab.

Is there a connection between AFib and Dementia

Is there a connection between AFib and Dementia?

One of the most comprehensive studies to date has revealed more evidence that people diagnosed with atrial fibrillation (AFib), a type of rapid or irregular heartbeat may be at greater risk for cognitive decline and dementia.

The new study doesn’t conclude if the association is more than a correlation, and there is no evidence showing atrial fibrillation is an actual cause of cognitive decline or dementia.

Dr. Lin Yee Chen, a cardiac electrophysiologist and associate professor at the University of Minnesota Medical School in Minneapolis who led the study stated that “the short answer is we don’t know. It is too early to say that atrial fibrillation directly causes cognitive decline.”

The new findings, published March 7, 2018 in the Journal of the American Heart Association, come from data gathered on 12,500 women and men from North Carolina, Maryland, Minnesota and Mississippi enrolled in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. Over half the participants were women and about a quarter were African-American.To read more about the study.

One of First Coast Heart & Vascular Center’s Electrophysiologists, Dr. Neil Sanghvi offers his viewpoint on this interesting study.

Neil Sanghvi, MD“The ARIC-NCS study highlights another risk associated with atrial fibrillation – the risk of worsening cognitive functioning and potential risk of future dementia.  

“Asymptomatic” AF may not truly be asymptomatic since these future consequences of long-standing AF need to be considered.  Talk to your physician about appropriate management including adequate anticoagulation.”

Symptoms and Conditions of the Heart and Vascular Systems

Today heart disease is America’s number one killer, but, unlike many diseases, there isn’t a specific age to start screening for heart or vascular disease. Your primary care doctor may refer you to a cardiologist if you have risk factors for cardiovascular disease or you are exhibiting symptoms that suggest that it may already be present.

Nearly half of Americans have at least one risk factor for heart disease, such as high blood pressure, obesity, physical inactivity or an unhealthy diet. Risk also increases with age.

While our First Coast Heart & Vascular physicians are your partners in heart health, you are your own best advocate. Become familiar with the risk factors and the symptoms of heart and vascular problems.  Talk to your doctor if you notice changes in your health and don’t hesitate to make an appointment with one of First Coast Heart & Vascular Center’s physicians today. If you experience any of the following symptoms of heart or vascular system disease:

HEART

  • Angina (chest pain).
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Irregular heartbeat.
  • Weakness, slurred speech, dizziness, coldness, numbness or pain in the arms or legs.
  • Pain in the throat, jaw, neck, upper abdomen or back.
  • Note: Men usually have chest pain whereas women often experience extreme fatigue, shortness of breath and/or nausea.
  • Swelling of the legs or abdomen.
  • Heart infection (pericarditis, myocarditis, endocarditis).

Vascular Disease

Vascular disease deals with the circulatory system outside of your heart. Vascular disease is frequently called a silent threat since the symptoms of vascular disease may be sudden or may not present themselves at all. Talk with your physician if you have any of the risk factors shown below, to find out if you are a candidate for a vascular screening test.

  • Peripheral vascular disease; uncontrolled hypertension, excessive muscle cramping, limb weakness, numbness, cold feet or hands, discoloration of legs ulcers in hands or legs, claudication (pain in the legs when walking), extremity hair loss or muscle wasting, abdominal pain with eating and weight loss or swelling of the legs.
  • TIA (Transischemic Attack or mini-stroke)
  • Stroke
  • Pulmonary Embolism (clots in the lungs)
  • Clots in the legs or arms

ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY

People with heart disease may present with symptoms such as an abnormal heartbeat or arrhythmia. Some of the symptoms include:

  • Palpitation or “racing of the heart”
  • Slow heartbeat
  • A “fluttering” feeling in the chest
  • Pain or discomfort in the chest area
  • Lightheadedness (even fainting)
  • Dizziness or shortness of breath
  • Atrial flutter or atrial fibrillation
  • Extra heartbeats or PVC (premature ventricular contractions)
  • Graying of the skin or turning blue
  • SVT (Supraventricular Tachycardia)

We work in harmony with your primary care physician to deliver diagnosis and treatment of all stages of heart and vascular disease. The following are health conditions that may put you at risk for a life-changing occurrence:

  • Aneurysms (abdomen, arms, legs) in both arteries and veins
  • Atrial fibrillation or any heart rhythm problem
  • “Clots” or DVT (Deep Vein Thrombosis) in extremities (arms, legs) or even in the heart
  • Diabetic issues
  • Heart attack
  • Heart failure
  • Heart valve disease (valve malfunction causing to be either leaky or blocked)
  • High cholesterol (Hyperlipidemia)
  • Hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • PAD (Peripheral Artery Disease)
  • Pulmonary Embolism
  • Stroke
  • Swollen legs
  • Shortness of breath, angina or chest pain
  • Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) or mini stroke
  • Varicose veins, spider veins, or leg ulcers due to vein disease.

Dr. Pubbi talks AFib at Memorial Hospital

Dr. Pubbi talks AFib at Memorial Hospital.

Recently Dr. Dinesh Pubbi was invited to give a talk at Memorial Hospital here in Jacksonville about the effects of Atrial Fibrillation. Atrial Fibrillation is the most common type of arrhythmia. Dr. Pubbi discussed treatment options, including the Watchman implant device procedure that he performs at Memorial Hospital, to reduce the risk of stroke.

Dr. Pubbi talks AFib at Memorial Hospital

Dr. Pubbi Discusses Atrial Fibrillation

Dr. Dinesh Pubbi was recently featured on First Coast Living and discussed Atrial Fibrillation also known as AFib.

What is atrial fibrillation?

  • Also called AFib.
  • Most common arrhythmia in USA and world wide.
  • 5 to 6.5 million now. By 2050 eight million will be effected.
  • Irregular heart beat from upper chamber of heart.

2- What are the signs/symptoms? What Do People Feel?

  • Some people may complain of palpitations shortness of breath, chest pain, racing heart.
  • Flip flops in heart fluttering or flopping.
  • Fatigue and tiredness.
  • 30% may not have any symptoms at all.

3- Are women more likely than men to have irregular heart beats? What about Race; are Afro Americans more likely than the white population to suffer from irregular heart beats?

  • Women tend to develop atrial fibrillation at an older age then men; 4 years older.
  • Risk of death higher in women with AFib.
  • Women need to see electrophysiologist sooner.
  • Caucasians have higher prevalence of AFib.

4-Is atrial fibrillation associated with stroke or heart attack risk?

  • AFib is the leading cause of stroke.
  • Risk of stroke five times higher than normal population.
  • Up to 80%of strokes in people with AFib can be prevented.

5 -How is AFib treated?

  • Depends on how long you have it.
  • Three kinds of AFib – paroxysmal, persistent, and permanent.
  • Reset the rhythm.
  • Prevent blood clots from forming.
  • Coumadin and the new agents.

6-Can a person be cured of AFib? Can it go away?

  • Antiaarrhythmic medications, cardio version.
  • Ablation can be a cure for some patients.
  • Catheter ablations minimal invasive.
  • Can use heat Radiofrequency energy or freeze cryotherapy.
    • Used to treat hot spots or abnormal cells.
    • This corrects the arrhythmia without the need of medication or implantable device.
  • Need to see Electrophysiology doctor.

Heart Drug Warfin used to treat AFib tied to Dementia Risk

Heart Drug Warfin used to treat AFib tied to Dementia Risk

An interesting study was recently published showing that people with the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation (AF) may be at a greater risk of developing dementia, and the quality of their drug treatment may play a role.

Researchers found that patients on the clot-preventing drug warfarin showed a higher dementia risk if their blood levels of the medication were frequently too high or too low.

This turned out to be true not only for people with AF, but also for those using warfarin for other reasons.

To read the entire article.

Heart Drug warfin tied to Dementia Risk

Dr. Neil Sanghvi commented on this study and article.

I believe this study highlights the importance of monitoring warfarin levels closely and to consider alternate anticoagulation options if the warfarin levels are difficult to maintain.  Patients should not become concerned if their warfarin level is in range > 75% of the time.  This study also supports the importance of using anticoagulation in AF patients since patients with too low warfarin levels were also prone to dementia.”

 

SOURCES: T. Jared Bunch, M.D., Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute, Murray, Utah; Gordon Tomaselli, M.D., chief, division of cardiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and past president, American Heart Association; May 5, 2016, presentation, Heart Rhythm Society annual meeting, San Francisco

Healthy Hearts Support Group Meeting May 19, 2016

Please join us for a Healthy Hearts Support Group Meeting May 19, 2016

Thursday, May 19th @ 6PM
JACKSONVILLE MARRIOTT
4670 Salisbury Rd. Jacksonville, FL 32256

Healthy Hearts Support Group Meeting May 19, 2016

Dr. Neil Sanghvi will talk about:
“What’s that fish flopping in my chest? Understanding Atrial Fibrillation”

Seating is limited please RSVP to jennifer.morrison@Firstcoastheart.com
Hors d’oeuvres & beverages will be provided.

A patient centered support group for discussing and understanding complete heart care. Attendees will find comfort and strength in education and self-awareness. Understand conditions of living with Cardiac Device Assistance, and connect with others to feel a sense of community. This forum is open to the public and free of charge. This group’s affiliation is not for profit.

Dr. Neil Sanghvi Discusses Women and Heart Disease

Dr. Neil Sanghvi discusses women and heart disease

Cardiologist, Dr. Neil Sanghvi discusses Women and Heart Disease at the WJCT studio Lunch & Learn community heart education. The title of his talk was “What does your sex have to do with it? How to keep your heart ticking.”

Dr. Sanghvi discussed the facts, symptoms and treatment of irregular heart rhythms as well as the differences between women and men when it comes to heart care.

Did you know that heart failure is more common in women than men, yet women receive treatment two times less often than men.