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Aspirin no longer recommended for heart attack prevention

[Dr. Neil Sanghvi discusses why taking daily doses of aspirin is no longer recommended for heart attack prevention for adults who don’t have heart disease or at high risk for developing heart disease.

New EP Lab Flagler Hospital St. Augustine

First Coast Heart & Vascular Center is proud to be a part of Flagler Hospital’s new EP Lab. Dr. Neil Sanghvi talks about the new EP Lab.

Bringing New EP Technology to St. Augustine

Dr. Neil SanghviBringing new EP Technology to St. Augustine

Great News about Dr. Neil Sanghvi and Flagler Hospital in St. Augustine. Together we are creating a new EP lab and ablation program. Flagler Hospital has committed resources to build a 1,000 square foot, state of the art hybird EP lab. The goal is to create one of the most advanced EP labs in Northeast Florida. Dr. Sanghvi is the Director of Electrophysiology Services for the hospital as well as being a partner with First Coast Heart & Vascular.  To read more.

Flagler Hospital St. Augustine
Flagler Hospital St. Augustine

New address for St. Augustine Office

New address for St. Augustine Office

We are excited to announce that we have moved our St. Augustine office to a larger office space. We are now located at 100 Whetstone Place, Suite 102, St. Augustine, FL 32086. The office building is at the corner of 312 and Sargent Tutten Drive. Our phone and fax numbers are the same. Phone: 904-342-8300  Fax: 904-342-8301.

Dr. Neil Sanghvi Discusses Sudden Cardiac Arrest on CBS

Recently Dr. Neil Sanghvi discussed Sudden Cardiac Arrest on the local CBS station here in Jacksonville, FL. He discussed SCA and new techniques that can help patients live with this condition.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) is a sudden and unanticipated pulseless condition attributed to termination of cardiac mechanical activity. It is frequently caused by ventricular fibrillation, an abnormality in the heart’s electrical system. When SCA strikes, the blood stops flowing to the brain, the heart, and the rest of the body, and the person suddenly passes out. In reality, this person is clinically dead and will remain so unless someone helps immediately.

A Heart Attack and Sudden Cardiac Arrest are not the same thing. A heart attack occurs when part of the heart’s blood supply is decreased or blocked, causing the heart muscle to become injured or die. A heart attack can be described as a “plumbing problem” in the heart. The heart attack victim is awake and may complain about one or more of the signs and symptoms of heart attack. In contrast, the SCA victim is not awake and needs immediate help in order to possibly survive.

A newer option called a subcutaneous defibrillator (S-ICD) offers the same protection but without touching the heart. Instead, it’s implanted just underneath the skin on the left side of the chest next to the rib cage. The device monitor your heart rhythm 24 hours a day.

The S-ICD may be a good option for people who have an active lifestyle. Because it has few or no upper-body and athletic restrictions, choosing the S-ICD means you should be able to continue doing the things you love to do.

Healthy Hearts Support Group Meeting May 19, 2016

Please join us for a Healthy Hearts Support Group Meeting May 19, 2016

Thursday, May 19th @ 6PM
JACKSONVILLE MARRIOTT
4670 Salisbury Rd. Jacksonville, FL 32256

Healthy Hearts Support Group Meeting May 19, 2016

Dr. Neil Sanghvi will talk about:
“What’s that fish flopping in my chest? Understanding Atrial Fibrillation”

Seating is limited please RSVP to jennifer.morrison@Firstcoastheart.com
Hors d’oeuvres & beverages will be provided.

A patient centered support group for discussing and understanding complete heart care. Attendees will find comfort and strength in education and self-awareness. Understand conditions of living with Cardiac Device Assistance, and connect with others to feel a sense of community. This forum is open to the public and free of charge. This group’s affiliation is not for profit.

Dr. Neil Sanghvi Discusses Women and Heart Disease

Dr. Neil Sanghvi discusses women and heart disease

Cardiologist, Dr. Neil Sanghvi discusses Women and Heart Disease at the WJCT studio Lunch & Learn community heart education. The title of his talk was “What does your sex have to do with it? How to keep your heart ticking.”

Dr. Sanghvi discussed the facts, symptoms and treatment of irregular heart rhythms as well as the differences between women and men when it comes to heart care.

Did you know that heart failure is more common in women than men, yet women receive treatment two times less often than men.

Dr. Sanghvi Interviewed by WJCT

Dr. Sanghvi interviewed by WJCT

Neil Sanghvi, MDOur very own, Dr. Neil Sanghvi was recently interviewed by WJCT Radio with host Melissa Ross on the First Coast Connect radio show. Click here to listen to the interview. Dr. Sanghvi discussed several heart health tips.

Dr. Neil Sanghvi interviewed on First Coast Living

Dr. Sanghvi was interviewed on First Coast Living and discussed the topics of Atrial Fibrillation, Pacemakers and Implantable Cardiac Devices. Dr. Sanghvi is an Electrophysiologist Cardiologist with First Coast Heart & Vascualr Center.

  1. What is a pacemaker and why would someone need one?   Pacemakers are devices that are about the size of a silver dollar.  They are placed under the skin usually below the collar bone.  They typically have anywhere from 1-3 wires that enter the heart via a blood vessel under the collar bone.  These devices are usually placed in patients who suffer from a slow heart beat which results in a number of symptoms including fatigue, shortness of breath, inability to exercise, lightheadedness, or fainting to name a few.
  2. What is a defibrillator, also known as an ICD, and why would someone need one of these devices?  ICDs are implantable devices that are placed in similar fashion as a pacemaker.  However, an ICD’s job is typically to treat fast and lethal irregular beats known as ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF).  Many people know that heart disease is the #1 killer in the US.  What many do not know is that the reason most patients die is due to untreated VT or VF.  Approximately 450,000 people die each year in the US from these arrhythmias.  Patients at the highest risk include those who have had a prior heart attack, especially if this has resulted in a weakened heart muscle.  Those with a weak heart muscle for other reasons are also at risk.  Also, patients who may have had several episodes of passing out without an explanation should be evaluated since a small portion of these patients are likely suffering from VT and/or VF.
  3. If a patient needs to have a device implanted, what type of device should be used?  This is a decision that is typically made by the implanting surgeon.  There are several manufacturers of devices in the US.  Many of the devices have similar features.  However, there are some distinct differences.
  4. What happens if there is a problem with one of the wires or if one device type needs to be changed to another?  Sometimes these devices may have a wire malfunction or one of the wires may be recalled due to a suspected risk of malfunction.  Many surgeons often place a new wire in the heart and leave the old wire abandoned there since they are not capable of taking out the old wire.  Unfortunately, this increases the risk of infections and for blood vessels to clot since there is more hardware in the body.  Patients should seek out surgeons that specialize in lead extractions.  Dr. Neil Sanghvi is able to utilize a laser to carefully and safely tease out the old lead that has scarred into the heart.  The risk of a major complication is often less than 1-2% in many cases.  The advantage is that it allows for less hardware to remain in the body which decreases the risks of infection and blood vessel clotting.

Your Sex and Heart Disease

What does your sex have to do with it? How to keep your heart ticking.

Join us for a FREE presentation, lunch, and discussion with heart expert Dr. Neil Sanghvi. The event will be held Wednesday, July 29 from Noon to 1pm at the WJCT Studios.

You will benefit from attending this event if you are interested in learning about the facts, symptoms, and treatments of irregular heart rhythms as well as understand the differences between women and men when it comes to heart care.

Surprising but true: Heart failure is more common in women than men, yet women receive treatment 2X less often than men. The focus of this community heart education talk is to discuss available therapies to treat irregular heartbeats and how women are treated differently than men.

Learn more about:

  • How to decide if a cardiac device is right for uou and life after implant.
  • The role of catheter ablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (Afib).
  • Men are Mars and Women are from Venus. Does it matter?

Dr. Neil Sanghvi

Dr. Sanghvi is recognized as a leader in the field of clinical electrophysiology.  His interests include atrial fibrillation, novel techniques for stroke prevention, and device therapy for heart failure and irregular rhythms.

 

Your sex and heart disease