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Category Archives: Education

Mitral Valve Replacement Procedure

Incredible work being done at First Coast Heart and Vascular! Dr Sunil Singh had an 84 year old male patient, with a failing surgical mitral valve along with increasing heart failure symptoms. He performed the minimally invasive transcatheter mitral valve replacement with an Edwards Sapien S3 valve. Patient is expected to see a great improvement in his heart failure symptoms! To learn more about Dr Singh or any of our wonderful doctors, please visit https://www.firstcoastheart.com/our-physicians/

To make an appointment at any one of our 9 locations, please call: Duval: (904) 423-0010 Clay: (904) 375-8100 St. Johns: (904) 342-8300 Flagler and Putnam: (386) 446-9966

#FCHV #FirstCoastHeart #memorialhospital #DrSingh #TopDocs #jacksonvillecardiologist #cardiologist #cardiology #HF #heartfailure #mitralvalve #mitralvalvereplacement #hearthealth #interventionalcardiology #interventionalcardiologist

World Heart Day 2020

Today is World Heart Day! World Heart Day is part of an international campaign to spread awareness about heart disease and stroke prevention. This is the perfect day to quit smoking, get exercising and start eating healthy ! All in the name of keeping your heart in good working order!

Learn about World Heart Day

The World Heart Federation have found that heart disease and strokes are the world’s leading cause of death, killing 17.1 million people every year. More than victims of cancer, HIV and AIDS and malaria.

Overeating, lack of exercise, unhealthy diets and high blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose levels are all factors which can trigger heart disease and threaten our own lives, and those of loved ones. Heart Day was set up to drive home the message that heart problems can be prevented.

History of World Heart Day

The mission is to improve health globally by encouraging people to make lifestyle changes and promoting education about ways to care for your heart. This lesson is becoming relevant as reports of obesity, poor diet and physical inactivity in children and young people become more common.

World Heart Day is celebrated every year. It was created by the World Heart Federation. The first World Heart Day took place back in 2000. Since then, in 2012, global leaders committed to the reduction of mortality from non-communicable diseases by 25 percent by 2025.

Did you know that almost half of the NCD deaths happen because of cardiovascular disease? This makes it the biggest killer across the world. World Heart Day is the perfect platform for the community to come together in the battle against cardiovascular disease.

How to observe World Heart Day

World Heart Day is all about drawing people’s attention to heart diseases and illnesses, as well as the range of health issues that are associated with this. It makes sense to raise awareness and also improve your own understanding. We recommend taking some time to do a bit of research about heart conditions and risk factors.

There are organizations that take part in this date around the world. They do this through the organization of science fairs, exhibitions, walks, and marathons. Some famous buildings, and landmarks opt to go red on this date so that they can show their support.

If you are opting to celebrate this day, it is important to try and be more attentive to your own heart health. There are a number of different ways that you can do this. This includes following a healthy diet, quitting alcohol, stopping smoking, and getting involved in physical exercises. It is also important to have your cholesterol, blood pressure, and heart checked on a regular basis. 

There are different charities and organizations that do great work when it comes to raising awareness and finding cures for different heart problems. They would appreciate a donation, whether this is a donation of your time, money. Anything that you can do can make a difference to someone’s life!

To learn more, visit: https://www.world-heart-federation.org/world-heart-day/world-heart-day-2020/
#FCHV #FirstCoastHeart #HeartDay #WorldHeartDay #CVD #HeartAssociation #HeartHealth #Cardiology #Cardiologist #StAugustineCardiology #HealthyHeart #HeartDoctors #TopDocs #cardiovasculardisease

Total Revascularization procedure

Yesterday Dr. Edwards, of First Coast Heart and Vascular, performed a Total Revascularization of long anterior tibial artery, called a CTO (chronic total occlusion). This was done through a 5 French radial sheath placed in the dorsalis Pedis artery. This was done to improve blood flow to a non healing ulcer. This procedure was done right in our own Cath Lab. To learn more about our practice, visit www.firstcoastheart.com #FCHV #FirstCoastHeart #DrEdwards #CathLab #CTO #CathLab #Cardiology #Vascular #topdocs #bestcardiologist

Before and after of the anterior tibial artery to improve blood flow to a non healing ulcer.

LEARN WITH THE LEADERS!

Dr. Ameeth Vedre, a General Cardiologist for First Coast Heart and Vascular, will be presenting an educational webinar on Monday, July 27th at 12:30 pm. The topic will be: Cardiovascular Prevention 2020: The Other Pandemic. There will be a chance to ask questions via chat, so bring your all your cardiology questions for Dr. Vedre!

Register Here: https://encoredocs.com/event/cardiovascular-prevention-2020-the-other-pandemic/

#FCHV #FirstCoastHeart #Cardiology #cardiologist #DrVedre #DrV #weloveourpatients #seminar #askyourdoctor #patienteducation #covid #covid_19 #bestdoctors #topdocs #topdoctors #bestcardiologist #zoom #zoommeeting

New Heart Failure Device Clinic

First Coast Heart and Vascular has started a Heart Failure- Device Clinic. Supervised by our 3 Electrophysiologists, Dr. Dinesh Pubbi, Dr. Neil Sanghvi, and Dr. Nicholas Mandalakas, and cardiac device clinic manager, Paul Begley, we are monitoring specific heart failure diagnostics in our implanted devices to help catch symptoms of HF before it progresses. We are hoping prevent future HF hospitalizations in our patients. Managing our heart failure patients with implantable devices is all about being proactive, not reactive, and catching HF early before it progresses. This patient, JM, came in today after her remote monitor sent us a transmission suggesting the patient may have been in the early stages of worsening HF. After talking with the patient, she immediately came in and was seen by Dr. Pubbi. The patient was so thankful she received a call and sure enough, was experiencing SOB and felt “awful” . These tools help us proactively manage our cardiac device clinic patients with heart failure. #FCHV #FirstCoastHeart #DrPubbi#DrSanghvi #DrMandalakas #Cardiology #cardiologists #HeartFailure #HF #HeartFailureDeviceClinic #GreatDoctors

Long-Term Efficacy and Safety of Evolocumab in Patients With Hypercholesterolemia

Here is a recent study conducted by Dr. Michael J. Koren of First Coast Heart and Vascular.

Long-Term Efficacy and Safety of Evolocumab in Patients With Hypercholes.._

The link between heart disease and sleep.

People struggling with heart disease have unique sleep needs and are often more prone to specific sleep disorders like sleep apnea and insomnia. Visit https://www.sleephelp.org/heart-disease-and-sleep/ to see treatment options and tips.

Dr. Dinesh Pubbi discusses AFib Part 1

Electrophysiologist, Dr. Dinesh Pubbi with First Coast Heart & Vascular Center discusses Atrial Fibrillation (AFib).

The Link between Heart Disease and Diabetes

The majority of people living with diabetes understand that they have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. But the following statistics show clearly that there is a strong link between heart disease and diabetes.

  • As many as 68 percent of people age 65 and older with diabetes die from some form of heart disease.  Approximately 16 percent will die of a stroke.
  • Adults who have diabetes have twice the chance of developing heart disease as people who don’t have diabetes.
  • The American Heart Association considers diabetes to be one of the seven main controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

The link between diabetes and heart disease begins with high blood sugar levels. Over time, the high glucose in the bloodstream injures the arteries, making them become stiff and hard.

The fatty material that builds up on the inside of these blood vessels can obstruct blood flow to the heart or brain and potentially cause a heart attack or stroke. Your risk of heart disease with diabetes is even higher if you also have a family history of cardiovascular disease or stroke.

Diabetes can also affect many major organs in your body, which can lead to an assortment of dangerous complications when left untreated. These medical problems include:

  • Cardiovascular disease including peripheral artery disease (PAD) and stroke;
  • Kidney disease;
  • Harmful cholesterol levels, which can cause atherosclerosis;
  • Damage to one’s eyesight;
  • Nerve damage and numbness in your extremities which can result in amputation;
  • Metabolic syndrome;

Healthy Lifestyle Habits

It’s important to have healthy lifestyle habits that can help you control your diabetes and prevent heart disease.

  • Follow a healthy eating plan.
  • Physical activity should be a part of your daily routine.
  • Stay at or get to a healthy weight.
  • Work with your health care team to manage your disease, which may include the use of medications.
  • Know your health numbers. – blood pressure and diabetes.

Managing your Diabetes

Understanding your diabetes numbers will reduce your risk for heart disease.

  • The A1C test reveals your average blood sugar level over the past three months. High blood sugar levels can damage your heart, blood vessels, kidneys, feet, and eyes.
  • High blood pressure makes your heart to work too hard. It can cause a heart attack, stroke and kidney disease.
  • There are two types of cholesterol LDL and HDL. LDL is often referred to as the bad cholesterol. It can build up and clog your blood vessels and can trigger a heart attack or stroke. Talk with your health care provider about your cholesterol numbers. Sometimes you may need to take medications to lower your cholesterol and protect your heart.
  • Don’t smoke and quit if you do. It is particularly important for people with diabetes since both smoking and diabetes narrow the blood vessels, so your heart has to work even harder.

Is there a connection between AFib and Dementia

Is there a connection between AFib and Dementia?

One of the most comprehensive studies to date has revealed more evidence that people diagnosed with atrial fibrillation (AFib), a type of rapid or irregular heartbeat may be at greater risk for cognitive decline and dementia.

The new study doesn’t conclude if the association is more than a correlation, and there is no evidence showing atrial fibrillation is an actual cause of cognitive decline or dementia.

Dr. Lin Yee Chen, a cardiac electrophysiologist and associate professor at the University of Minnesota Medical School in Minneapolis who led the study stated that “the short answer is we don’t know. It is too early to say that atrial fibrillation directly causes cognitive decline.”

The new findings, published March 7, 2018 in the Journal of the American Heart Association, come from data gathered on 12,500 women and men from North Carolina, Maryland, Minnesota and Mississippi enrolled in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. Over half the participants were women and about a quarter were African-American.To read more about the study.

One of First Coast Heart & Vascular Center’s Electrophysiologists, Dr. Neil Sanghvi offers his viewpoint on this interesting study.

Neil Sanghvi, MD“The ARIC-NCS study highlights another risk associated with atrial fibrillation – the risk of worsening cognitive functioning and potential risk of future dementia.  

“Asymptomatic” AF may not truly be asymptomatic since these future consequences of long-standing AF need to be considered.  Talk to your physician about appropriate management including adequate anticoagulation.”